Non-Human BODIES Recovered in New Mexico | 1947 Roswell "UFO" Crash

Non-Human BODIES Recovered in New Mexico | 1947 Roswell "UFO" Crash

Our team of UFO & Alien Investigators©, explain how non-human bodies could be recovered in New Mexico around 1947. This time period coincides with the 1947 Roswell "UFO" Crash in which people speak about multiple crash sites and small non-human bodies being recovered. Could there have actually been real bodies recovered. Well... Let's discuss the difficult topic and discuss the top secret operations occurring in New Mexico in the time related to the end of World War 2, plus the race to space. 

 

 

Our best available unclassified / non-destroyed information: "Using a combination of recovered and new parts, V-2s began to fly in 1946. The first V-2 to roar to life on American soil was part of a static fire test on March 15; the rocket fired for 57 seconds, demonstrating its power and potential... The first V-2 Blossom to carry a monkey (missile 37) launched on June 11, 1948 with Albert I on board. The rocket reached a peak altitude of 39 miles before its ascent was cut off by a failed valve. Though the rocket didn’t explode, Albert I likely didn’t make it to apogee. He’s thought to have succumbed to breathing problems in his cramped cabin. But he would have died anyways; the parachute system also failed." - Popsci "The Aerobee was also used to conduct one of the earliest U.S. physiological experiments on the road to manned space flight. On May 22, 1952, at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M., two Philippine monkeys, Patricia and Mike, were enclosed in an Aerobee nose section at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. Patricia was placed in a sitting position and Mike in a prone position to measure the effects of rapid acceleration on them. Fired to an altitude of 36 miles and a speed of 2,000 mph, these two monkeys were the first primates to reach so high an altitude. Along with the monkeys, two white mice, Mildred and Albert, also rode in the Aerobee nose. They were inside a slowly rotating drum in which they could "float" during the period of weightlessness. The section containing the animals was recovered safely from the upper atmosphere by parachute. Patricia died of natural causes about two years later and Mike in 1967, both at the National Zoological Park in Washington, D.C. They are represented in the Aerobee compartment display at the museum by models. The two preserved mice on display are the real Mildred and Albert." - AF

The Alberts, Spaceflight’s Unsung Heroes: https://www.popsci.com/blog-network/vintage-space/alberts-spaceflights-unsung-heroes/ Patricia and Mike: https://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/Visit/Museum-Exhibits/Fact-Sheets/Display/Article/198112/aerojet-aerobee-rocket/ Monkeys in Space: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monkeys_and_apes_in_space  

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